The Student Journalism Site of Millard South High School

We Are Millard South

The Student Journalism Site of Millard South High School

We Are Millard South

The Student Journalism Site of Millard South High School

We Are Millard South

Entertainment on Strike

What Hollywood labor disputes mean for popular movies and TV
Artist+Statement%3A+This+piece+involves+characters+from+shows+and+movies+affected+by+the+writers+strike.+I+drew+these+characters+as+if+they+were+in+a+meeting+with+the+writer+except+there+is+no+writer.+They+all+have+worried+to+nonchalant+faces+expressing+their+concern+and+unawareness.+I+used+pencil+and+a+fine+tip+marker+as+my+media+so+that+I+could+easily+shade+and+extenuate+their+outlines.+I+decided+to+not+work+with+color+to+give+more+of+a+gloomy+and+serious+vibe.+As+I+drew+the+background+I+envisioned+what+a+meeting+room+would+look+like+with+big+open+windows+leveling+with+the+clouds%2C+plain+walls%2C+and+carpet+instead+of+tiles.+With+the+characters%2C+I+had+used+reference+photos+to+make+sure+I+drew+them+correctly.+Drawing+the+actors%2C+i+had+specifically+used+reference+photos+of+their+side+profiles.+As+I+searched+for+side+profiles+of+the+cartoon+characters+I+noticed+that+looking+for+a+picture+and+even+watching+clips+of+the+character+was+difficult+because+they+are+rarely+originally+drawn+showing+their+side+profile+so+i+had+to+keeping+redrawing+the+character+until+it+looked+right.+I+drew+this+in+my+sketch+book+and+then+scanned+the+artwork+on+a+flatbed+scanner+and+used+Photoshop+to+pop+the+contrast+a+little+and+clean+up+any+extra+marks+or+dirty+white+areas+with+the+eraser+tool.+With+this+art+piece+I+definitely+had+to+make+sure+I+drew+the+characters+and+actors+carefully+so+that+the+viewers+could+easily+identify+who+they+all+are%2C+making+it+a+tedious+task.+I+would+have+my+classmates+look+at+the+art+to+receive+feedback+on+whether+or+not+I+had+accomplished+my+goal.
Ali Arias
Artist Statement: This piece involves characters from shows and movies affected by the writer’s strike. I drew these characters as if they were in a meeting with the writer except there is no writer. They all have worried to nonchalant faces expressing their concern and unawareness. I used pencil and a fine tip marker as my media so that I could easily shade and extenuate their outlines. I decided to not work with color to give more of a gloomy and serious vibe. As I drew the background I envisioned what a meeting room would look like with big open windows leveling with the clouds, plain walls, and carpet instead of tiles. With the characters, I had used reference photos to make sure I drew them correctly. Drawing the actors, i had specifically used reference photos of their side profiles. As I searched for side profiles of the cartoon characters I noticed that looking for a picture and even watching clips of the character was difficult because they are rarely originally drawn showing their side profile so i had to keeping redrawing the character until it looked “right”. I drew this in my sketch book and then scanned the artwork on a flatbed scanner and used Photoshop to pop the contrast a little and clean up any extra marks or dirty white areas with the eraser tool. With this art piece I definitely had to make sure I drew the characters and actors carefully so that the viewers could easily identify who they all are, making it a tedious task. I would have my classmates look at the art to receive feedback on whether or not I had accomplished my goal.

Senior Jack Carlson has been a huge fan of Sony’s animated Spider-Man movies since 2018, when the premier of “Into the Spider-Verse” stunned audiences worldwide. After the release of its smash-hit sequel this summer, Carlson’s anticipation for the third and final installment in the series has only grown. However, widespread and ongoing strikes among Hollywood artists have put his expectations on indefinite delay. 

After expressing his initial disappointment with the movie’s delay, Carlson commented on the possible outcome of the strikes: “It’s important that the industry changes, and if that means a project has to be delayed a while, then so be it.” 

It’s important that the industry changes, and if that means a project has to be delayed a while, then so be it.

— senior Jack Carlson

When you think of the term strike, you most often associate a strike action with the blue-collar working class, the real salt-of-the-earth – miners, truck drivers, stevedores, railroad workers, and the like – with the odd teachers’ or sanitation workers’ strike here and there. Since early July, the United States has been dealing with a whole different kind of labor dispute seldom seen by our generation: Hollywood screenwriters and actors are walking out of the studio and marching down the picket line.

The filmmakers’ unions at the heart of the strikes are the Writers Guild of America (WGA) and the Screen Actors Guild – American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA), which, together, represent hundreds of thousands of film and television creatives across America. Their dispute is against the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP), which represents over 350 prominent film production companies, the likes of which include entertainment giants like Disney, Netflix, and FOX. 

The primary issues taken up with the strikes are job security and wages; Artists working in the entertainment industry believe they should be paid more, and for the entire duration of pre- and post-production of the movies and shows they work on. Writers and actors have also complained about a lack of residuals – payments made to creatives after a piece of media’s initial release run – they receive from streaming services. On top of that, there are growing concerns about the integration of rapidly-developing artificial intelligence into the creative process, which many artists fear might take over their jobs. Tensions between artists and producers have been building for some time now, with studios becoming more and more hostile towards the demands of Hollywood labor unions to rectify these growing issues. 

Hollywood writers and actors guilds have struck separately in the past for myriad reasons, but their differing interests and avenues of negotiation with producers mean they rarely collaborate on labor disputes; The current joint strike is the first of its kind since 1960, when SAG and the WGA simultaneously struck for better wages and pensions.

The current creative work stoppages have stalled hundreds of AMPTP-affiliated productions, affecting the largest interruption to the entertainment industry since the beginning of the Coronavirus pandemic in 2020. 

“Spider-Man: Beyond the Spider-Verse” is among the many projects put on indefinite hold. Senior Jalen Hobbs has been closely following the film’s development in the wake of the strikes, saying, “I know the producers said they haven’t worked on it much at all because of the writers’ strike, and because of that they can’t do any animation.”

“These studios make a lot of money, and they’re not paying their fair share to their writers who are the backbone of all their productions,” Hobbs continued. “It’s kind of a shame that the studios aren’t doing this already so the writer’s have to strike for weeks and months at a time to do something about it.”

Though the WGA has reached a tentative deal with studios to put an end to its strike, it is unclear when exactly SAG will do the same, or if the strikes will yield any positive changes for film, television, and the entertainment industry as a whole.

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About the Contributors
Chase Zagurski
Chase Zagurski, Reporter
Chase is a senior. This is his first year on the newspaper staff. Outside of academics, Chase enjoys swimming, shooting, playing video games, and listening to music.
Ali Arias
Ali Arias, Artist
Ali is a senior and this is her first year on the newspaper staff. Outside of school, Ali enjoys finding new music to share and spending hours working on a new art piece. She takes many things as inspiration for her art and prioritizes critiquing.
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